In an effort to avoid sounding like a broken record, I am going to avoid dwelling on the abundant blessings we have received over the past several weeks in the form of liquid sunshine.

This past week Emerson Nafziger put out a nice article focused on Nitrogen availability and the current rainfall totals we have accumulated.  Please take a minute to read through his article.  Here is the link, click here.

 

Some other issues that are starting to pop up across the corn fields would be the potential for Gray Leaf Spot (GLS).  With all the surface moisture on the corn leaves early in the day, conditions will be right as we close in on tasseling in early planted fields.  Be sure to scout corn-on-corn fields and fields with history of GLS first.  Purdue extension is a very helpful website, click here for the link.

 

 

 

 

European corn borer and corn rootworm beetles should also be on your watch list while scouting fields.  It has been several years since I have seen moth flights as heavy as I have noticed recently.  For any growers that chose to plant a non-Bt hybrid, now is the time to check for egg masses.  Insecticide applications will need to be scheduled prior to hatch and larvae boring into plants.  As corn starts to convert from vegetative to reproductive growth stages, silks will start to develop making a nice buffet for emerging adult rootworm beetles.  Monitor for silk clipping to reduce any chance for pollination issues.

 

 

 

 

  

Soybeans have started to set flowers.  Response is crucial to disease and insect pressure as we enter the reproductive stage and try to maximize pod set.  White Mold and Septoria Brown Spot can really get going with our current environmental conditions.  With either, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Be vigilant in scouting and talk to you crop protection supplier about a strategy to combat if necessary.

 

See I barely talked about that four letter word.

Until next time,

Sean D. Jordal

Agronomist

ProHarvest Seeds

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